Florida Commercial Truck Insurance Requirements 

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Last Modified: January 31, 2024

Florida Commercial Truck Insurance Requirements for Motor Carriers are first based on Federal Requirements set by FMCSA.

FMCSA is the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration which oversees the Department of Transportation.

In order to drive legally, commercial trucks hauling freight for hire across state lines must first register with FMCSA.

FMCSA then assigns you a DOT number.

Proof of Commercial Auto Liability Insurance limits are then required.

Your insurance provider supplies that proof directly to FMCSA with a BMC-91X Filing.

An MCS-90 is the endorsement to your policy which guarantees the insurance.

Once that’s completed you are granted an MC, Motor Carrier Operating Authority and are legal to haul freight for hire across state lines.

 

FMCSA Commercial Auto Liability Requirements for Motor Carriers

$750,000 minimum for Commercial Trucks hauling general freight

$300,000 minimum for Commercial Trucks hauling household goods

$300,000 minimum for Commercial Van and Sprinter Insurance

 

Sprinter
Sprinters hauling freight across state lines required to carry $300,000 Liability Insurance

 

Florida Commercial Truck Insurance Requirements include two other types of insurance:

 

This is because Florida is a no-fault state where every driver is responsible for their own Medical or Property Damage expenses up to $10,000 each.

All vehicles tagged in Florida are required to carry both Personal Injury Protection (PIP) and Property Damage Liability (PDL) insurance.

So if you get hurt in a car accident you file the claim with your own insurance company first, regardless of who was at fault.

 

  • Minimum Florida Personal Injury Protection (PIP) covers medical expenses up to $10,000.
  • Minimum Florida Property Damage Liability (PDL) covers damage to property up to $10,000.

 

PIP covers 80% of all necessary and reasonable medical expenses up to $10,000 resulting from a covered injury, no matter who caused the crash.

PDL pays for damage to another person’s property caused by you or someone else driving your vehicle.

 

When you purchase your Commercial Truck Insurance, your insurer will file proof of this coverage with the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles. (DHSMV)

They also notify Florida DHSMV when you no longer have this required insurance coverage on your truck.

Regardless of whether you’re actually using your truck, it’s important to keep your Florida commercial truck insurance in force for the entire time you own your truck.

If it should lapse, Florida DHSMV then has the authority to suspend your driving privileges, license plate and registration for up to 3 years for an uninsured vehicle.

Be sure to surrender your license plate/tag BEFORE cancelling your insurance.

This rule applies whether or not you are a Motor Carrier hauling freight for hire across state lines, this is a Florida statute for everyone.

 

States can also have different rules for their own tags, licensing and taxes on commercial vehicles.

What makes a truck a commercial vehicle in Florida?

Florida Statute 320.01(26) includes commercial vehicle designation to vehicles or combination of vehicle and trailer at GVW 26,001 lbs or more.

That includes 1 ton Duallys with Trailers commonly used for HotShot trucking when the combination of both exceeds 26,001 lbs.

HotShot Truck insurance usually falls under the $750,000 limit requirement.

HotShot Dually Truck with Trailer
HotShot Dually Truck with Trailer & Equipment

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trucks with three or more axles regardless of weight are also required to register as commercial vehicles.

Trucks used for personal use and not for hire are not required to register as a commercial vehicle in Florida.

 

[Related Story – What is the Definition of a Commercial Vehicle]

 

Florida motor vehicles registration fees are based on the Gross Vehicle Weight of the truck.

Here’s what you need to register a commercial truck in Florida:

  1.  Vehicle ID number (VIN #) of the truck
  2. Proof of your Florida insurance including PIP & PDL
  3. Proof of Florida residence

 

Florida requires that you display either your Florida Registration Number or U.S. DOT Number on the side of your truck.

 

If you are over 26,000 GVW and haul freight for hire across state lines you will need a Florida IRP and IFTA.

 

International Registration Plan (IRP) is a reciprocal agreement that allows you to purchase one license plate which registers you with all other states and Canada.

Here is a sample of your IRP form.

Once completed, you are required to display apportioned license plates on your truck.

 

International Fuel Tax Agreement (IFTA) is an agreement between states to pay taxes based on the amount of miles traveled in the state instead of where the fuel was purchased.

You will also need to display your IFTA decal on your truck.

Here’s how you get your Florida Commercial Truck IFTA decal:

  1.  Click, complete then print your Application for International Fuel Tax Agreement and accompanying decal order forms.
  2.  Make a copy then snail mail to:

 

Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles Division of Motorist Services
Bureau of Commercial Vehicle and Driver Services
2900 Apalachee Parkway, MAIL STOP 62
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0626

There is no charge for the IFTA license, but Florida IFTA decals are $4.00 per pair.

 

For more help, just give us a call at CIS.

We’d love to help get you on the road, and start earning money.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Authors

  • 2002 Founder and CEO of Commercial Insurance Solutions, Inc., Shelly Benisch specializes in providing Commercial Truck Insurance for owner operators and small motor carriers. Both CIS and TRS certified, She also writes a free educational trucking insurance advice blog dedicated to the little guy.

  • Executive Director of Commercial Insurance Solutions, Inc., Christina Cummings leads her team in providing the best Truck Insurance with the best rates for Owner Operators and small Motor Carriers. Christina is TRS certified as a Transportation Risk Specialist. She is your "go to" person at CIS with questions, tips and networking opportunities in our trucking and expediting community.

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